Discussion:
Torque wrench recommendations
(too old to reply)
Ben Halicki
2005-03-12 10:30:51 UTC
Permalink
Hi all,

I'm looking to buy a torque wrench over the next few days and was
wondering if you guys could give me a few tips on what to buy. I have
found one made by Norbar, which should handle anything between 8-60NM,
but wasn't sure if I should go 3/8 or 1/2"? It'll spend most of its
days tightening engine bolts. What do you guys use?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Ben.
Paul Cassel
2005-03-12 14:14:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ben Halicki
Hi all,
I'm looking to buy a torque wrench over the next few days and was
wondering if you guys could give me a few tips on what to buy. I have
found one made by Norbar, which should handle anything between 8-60NM,
but wasn't sure if I should go 3/8 or 1/2"? It'll spend most of its
days tightening engine bolts. What do you guys use?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Makes no diff. The adapter, like extensions, won't affect the torque
readings.
G C
2005-03-12 14:50:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ben Halicki
Hi all,
I'm looking to buy a torque wrench over the next few days and was
wondering if you guys could give me a few tips on what to buy. I have
found one made by Norbar, which should handle anything between 8-60NM,
but wasn't sure if I should go 3/8 or 1/2"? It'll spend most of its
days tightening engine bolts. What do you guys use?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
Ben.
Having spent much time setting and calibrating manual and power torque
tools at the plant, I've got a few ideas. Calibrating the technicians
hand adjustable wrenches has led me to the conclusion to stay away from
the expensive brand name that begins with an "S". They are almost
universally out of range and require frequent recalibration. The "M"
Brand seem to be the best for accuracy and repeatability. "C" brand are
also very good. (Surprised me) The very expensive German power tools are
extremely good but hard to set and only needed if you are doing
production. (We were, I had over 600 of these to check monthly).

Make sure you use torque wrenches that have the desired value near the
center of their range. (This means several wrenches for most automotive
uses) Torque wrenches are very inaccurate at the bottom and top of their
adjustment ranges. (Over 20%)

Beam type are more accurate but harder to use.
Clickers take some training to use correctly. (e.g.. SLOWLY pull to
torque, as it breaks over the set range if you are pulling hard, you can
over torque by 10-15 pound feet.) Never click twice, it only over torques.
--
Gopher 33 28 19N 112 01 49W
'77 CB750K '78 CB750K
'00 ZG1000 '96 Ducati 900SS
**********pull 'mychain' to reply***********
("I've abandoned the idea of trying to appear a normal, pleasant person.
I had to accept myself as I was, even if no one else could accept me.
For the rest of my life I would continue to say precisely the wrong
thing, touch people in the raw and be generally unpopular. I had a
natural gift for it" W. F. Temple)
gcash
2005-03-12 18:56:17 UTC
Permalink
... brand name that begins with an "S"...
... The "M" Brand ...
..."C" brand...
Stop fucking around and say what you mean.

If something is a piece of shit, it deserves to be called a piece of
shit. Likewise, if something is great, it deserves to be called it.

Stop the mealymouthed crap.

-gc
--
Never losing sight of your goal usually results in getting brained by
a hockey stick.
G C
2005-03-14 02:28:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by gcash
... brand name that begins with an "S"...
... The "M" Brand ...
..."C" brand...
Stop fucking around and say what you mean.
If something is a piece of shit, it deserves to be called a piece of
shit. Likewise, if something is great, it deserves to be called it.
Stop the mealymouthed crap.
-gc
It is my opinion on the quality of those tools. (Based on MY experience)
I will let others draw their own conclusions. If I spell out the name,
and you know who I mean, people will go blind on brand loyalty like a
Harley 'owner' confronted by Goldwing 'rider'. SEG.

BTW, the M brand was Matco not MAC. The soft break, initial accuracy and
number of cycles between needing adjustment were tops.

JOIBO
--
Gopher 33 28 19N 112 01 49W
'77 CB750K '78 CB750K
'00 ZG1000 '96 Ducati 900SS
**********pull 'mychain' to reply***********
("I've abandoned the idea of trying to appear a normal, pleasant person.
I had to accept myself as I was, even if no one else could accept me.
For the rest of my life I would continue to say precisely the wrong
thing, touch people in the raw and be generally unpopular. I had a
natural gift for it" W. F. Temple)
gcash
2005-03-14 04:36:23 UTC
Permalink
It is my opinion on the quality of those tools. (Based on MY experience) I
will let others draw their own conclusions. If I spell out the name, and you
know who I mean, people will go blind on brand loyalty like a Harley 'owner'
confronted by Goldwing 'rider'. SEG.
Why the hell are you even bothering to post?

I have no clue what brands you're talking about, so your post is just so much
frustrating noise and makes you look like the "I've got a secret" moron in the
3rd grade schoolyard.

I've used Craftsman and that's it, because that's about the only brand I have
ready access to, but if I knew there was something better, I'd try to get one.

I'd like to listen to someone that has experience with this stuff, but your
"opinion" is useless to me.

I guess it doesn't matter. I don't even use click-type wrenches anymore
because they overtorque things and I've given up finding anything better.

-gc
--
Never losing sight of your goal usually results in getting brained by
a hockey stick.
G C
2005-03-14 12:44:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by gcash
Why the hell are you even bothering to post?
because not everyone is so obtuse.
Post by gcash
I have no clue what brands you're talking about, so your post is just so much
frustrating noise and makes you look like the "I've got a secret" moron in the
3rd grade schoolyard.
Then maybe your not posting in the US.
Post by gcash
I've used Craftsman and that's it, because that's about the only brand I have
ready access to, but if I knew there was something better, I'd try to get one.
I'd like to listen to someone that has experience with this stuff, but your
"opinion" is useless to me.
Opinions are like assholes, everyones got one.
Post by gcash
I guess it doesn't matter. I don't even use click-type wrenches anymore
because they overtorque things and I've given up finding anything better.
Learn to use your clicker. You can't just pull 'em till it breaks. It
takes the same feel as a beam or dial type to not over torque. And the
seemingly human need to click it twice will bump up the torque 10ft/lb
each time on a 1/2" drive set to around 50/60 ft/lb.
--
Gopher 33 28 19N 112 01 49W
'77 CB750K '78 CB750K
'00 ZG1000 '96 Ducati 900SS
**********pull 'mychain' to reply***********
("I've abandoned the idea of trying to appear a normal, pleasant person.
I had to accept myself as I was, even if no one else could accept me.
For the rest of my life I would continue to say precisely the wrong
thing, touch people in the raw and be generally unpopular. I had a
natural gift for it" W. F. Temple)
Rob Kleinschmidt
2005-03-14 21:09:15 UTC
Permalink
G C wrote:

I'm currently shopping for a lightweight and/or a wide range
wrench.

Currently I've got 50 and 150 ft/lb wrenches.

I'm thinking of either something in the 240 in/lb. range or
possibly something like a Craftsman electronic torque meter.

I kinda dislike clickers but they seem to be a lot more common
these days than beam wrenches.

I'm not real sure about the accuracy range on the Craftsman
torque meter. It's got a little electronic box that goes "ping",
so it certainly ought to be accurate :-) but I'm not sure
if the bottom 20% would have the same problems as a mechanical
wrench. I also understand they can be affected by magnetic
fields.

Any input appreciated.
Post by G C
Having spent much time setting and calibrating manual and power torque
tools at the plant, I've got a few ideas. Calibrating the technicians
hand adjustable wrenches has led me to the conclusion to stay away from
the expensive brand name that begins with an "S". They are almost
universally out of range and require frequent recalibration. The "M"
Brand seem to be the best for accuracy and repeatability. "C" brand are
also very good. (Surprised me) The very expensive German power tools are
extremely good but hard to set and only needed if you are doing
production. (We were, I had over 600 of these to check monthly).
Make sure you use torque wrenches that have the desired value near the
center of their range. (This means several wrenches for most
automotive
Post by G C
uses) Torque wrenches are very inaccurate at the bottom and top of their
adjustment ranges. (Over 20%)
Beam type are more accurate but harder to use.
Clickers take some training to use correctly. (e.g.. SLOWLY pull to
torque, as it breaks over the set range if you are pulling hard, you can
over torque by 10-15 pound feet.) Never click twice, it only over torques.
Elle
2005-03-14 21:45:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rob Kleinschmidt
I'm currently shopping for a lightweight and/or a wide range
wrench.
Currently I've got 50 and 150 ft/lb wrenches.
I'm thinking of either something in the 240 in/lb. range or
possibly something like a Craftsman electronic torque meter.
I kinda dislike clickers but they seem to be a lot more common
these days than beam wrenches.
I'm not real sure about the accuracy range on the Craftsman
torque meter. It's got a little electronic box that goes "ping",
so it certainly ought to be accurate :-) but I'm not sure
if the bottom 20% would have the same problems as a mechanical
wrench. I also understand they can be affected by magnetic
fields.
Any input appreciated.
I bought a Pittsburgh, 20 to 200 inch-lb. click type torque wrench from
Harbor Freight last June, on a Father's Day sale for $17.99 . Despite the
contempt some have for Pittsburgh/Harbor Freight, I couldn't resist the low
price. It works great, as far as I can tell. I use it a lot, as I have just
enough nuts and bolts on my car that are down in this range. This inch-lb
torque wrench supplements my other torque wrench by Husky, from Home Depot
in the U.S., $59, 10 to 100 ft-lbs, IIRC.

See the smaller torque wrench at
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=2696 , now
retailing for $29.

I looked at a Sears electronic torque wrench (not a clicker type nor beam
type) and suspect because of its design its calibration will last longer
and that it is more accurate. But one objection I had to it at the time was
that a lot of the work I do on my car has space limitations. I was doubtful
I could fit the whole transducer into where I needed to apply a torque.
Perhaps this is rarely an issue with a motorcycle. If so, I'd strongly
consider spending the $175 or so that Sears wanted for this.
G C
2005-03-15 03:34:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Elle
Post by Rob Kleinschmidt
I'm currently shopping for a lightweight and/or a wide range
wrench.
Currently I've got 50 and 150 ft/lb wrenches.
I'm thinking of either something in the 240 in/lb. range or
possibly something like a Craftsman electronic torque meter.
I kinda dislike clickers but they seem to be a lot more common
these days than beam wrenches.
I'm not real sure about the accuracy range on the Craftsman
torque meter. It's got a little electronic box that goes "ping",
so it certainly ought to be accurate :-) but I'm not sure
if the bottom 20% would have the same problems as a mechanical
wrench. I also understand they can be affected by magnetic
fields.
Any input appreciated.
I bought a Pittsburgh, 20 to 200 inch-lb. click type torque wrench from
Harbor Freight last June, on a Father's Day sale for $17.99 . Despite the
contempt some have for Pittsburgh/Harbor Freight, I couldn't resist the low
price. It works great, as far as I can tell. I use it a lot, as I have just
enough nuts and bolts on my car that are down in this range. This inch-lb
torque wrench supplements my other torque wrench by Husky, from Home Depot
in the U.S., $59, 10 to 100 ft-lbs, IIRC.
See the smaller torque wrench at
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=2696 , now
retailing for $29.
I looked at a Sears electronic torque wrench (not a clicker type nor beam
type) and suspect because of its design its calibration will last longer
and that it is more accurate. But one objection I had to it at the time was
that a lot of the work I do on my car has space limitations. I was doubtful
I could fit the whole transducer into where I needed to apply a torque.
Perhaps this is rarely an issue with a motorcycle. If so, I'd strongly
consider spending the $175 or so that Sears wanted for this.
Or, novel thought, use the transducer and an adaptor to check
calibration on your wrench. The electronic unit I use to calibrate is
much more complicated, but it gets used for more applications. To just
check a clicker or beam, it should be fine. For run down or power
applications I doubt it would work. (Calibration of one of my adaptors
cost 275USD and is required annually. Multiplied by 6 and it gets pricey
to be accurate. Then again, the mechanical tester cost 9K and is much
more fiddely (Tech Term) to use.
--
Gopher 33 28 19N 112 01 49W
'77 CB750K '78 CB750K
'00 ZG1000 '96 Ducati 900SS
**********pull 'mychain' to reply***********
("I've abandoned the idea of trying to appear a normal, pleasant person.
I had to accept myself as I was, even if no one else could accept me.
For the rest of my life I would continue to say precisely the wrong
thing, touch people in the raw and be generally unpopular. I had a
natural gift for it" W. F. Temple)
Rob Munach
2005-03-15 11:33:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Elle
Post by Rob Kleinschmidt
I'm currently shopping for a lightweight and/or a wide range
wrench.
Currently I've got 50 and 150 ft/lb wrenches.
I'm thinking of either something in the 240 in/lb. range or
possibly something like a Craftsman electronic torque meter.
I kinda dislike clickers but they seem to be a lot more common
these days than beam wrenches.
I'm not real sure about the accuracy range on the Craftsman
torque meter. It's got a little electronic box that goes "ping",
so it certainly ought to be accurate :-) but I'm not sure
if the bottom 20% would have the same problems as a mechanical
wrench. I also understand they can be affected by magnetic
fields.
Any input appreciated.
I bought a Pittsburgh, 20 to 200 inch-lb. click type torque wrench from
Harbor Freight last June, on a Father's Day sale for $17.99 . Despite the
contempt some have for Pittsburgh/Harbor Freight, I couldn't resist the low
price. It works great, as far as I can tell. I use it a lot, as I have just
enough nuts and bolts on my car that are down in this range. This inch-lb
torque wrench supplements my other torque wrench by Husky, from Home Depot
in the U.S., $59, 10 to 100 ft-lbs, IIRC.
See the smaller torque wrench at
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=2696 , now
retailing for $29.
I looked at a Sears electronic torque wrench (not a clicker type nor beam
type) and suspect because of its design its calibration will last longer
and that it is more accurate. But one objection I had to it at the time was
that a lot of the work I do on my car has space limitations. I was doubtful
I could fit the whole transducer into where I needed to apply a torque.
Perhaps this is rarely an issue with a motorcycle. If so, I'd strongly
consider spending the $175 or so that Sears wanted for this.
How do you know your Pittsburg wrench works great? I am sure it clicks
just fine, but at the correct torque?
--
Rob Munach, PE
Excel Engineering
PO Box 1264
Carrboro, NC 27510
Elle
2005-03-15 14:42:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
Post by Rob Kleinschmidt
I'm currently shopping for a lightweight and/or a wide range
wrench.
Currently I've got 50 and 150 ft/lb wrenches.
I'm thinking of either something in the 240 in/lb. range or
possibly something like a Craftsman electronic torque meter.
I kinda dislike clickers but they seem to be a lot more common
these days than beam wrenches.
I'm not real sure about the accuracy range on the Craftsman
torque meter. It's got a little electronic box that goes "ping",
so it certainly ought to be accurate :-) but I'm not sure
if the bottom 20% would have the same problems as a mechanical
wrench. I also understand they can be affected by magnetic
fields.
Any input appreciated.
I bought a Pittsburgh, 20 to 200 inch-lb. click type torque wrench from
Harbor Freight last June, on a Father's Day sale for $17.99 . Despite the
contempt some have for Pittsburgh/Harbor Freight, I couldn't resist the low
price. It works great, as far as I can tell. I use it a lot, as I have just
enough nuts and bolts on my car that are down in this range. This inch-lb
torque wrench supplements my other torque wrench by Husky, from Home Depot
in the U.S., $59, 10 to 100 ft-lbs, IIRC.
See the smaller torque wrench at
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=2696 , now
retailing for $29.
I looked at a Sears electronic torque wrench (not a clicker type nor beam
type) and suspect because of its design its calibration will last longer
and that it is more accurate. But one objection I had to it at the time was
that a lot of the work I do on my car has space limitations. I was doubtful
I could fit the whole transducer into where I needed to apply a torque.
Perhaps this is rarely an issue with a motorcycle. If so, I'd strongly
consider spending the $175 or so that Sears wanted for this.
How do you know your Pittsburg wrench works great?
Rob M.,

I said, "as far as I can tell."

I am going by (1) feel (I previously used a spring setup that I'd
calibrated with weights); (2) a few comparisons with the Husky torque
wrench at overlapping ranges. They appeared to be dead-on the same. It
clicks properly. It's easy enough to set.

Otherwise, how does one know any new torque wrench works great?
Post by Rob Munach
I am sure it clicks
just fine, but at the correct torque?
Elle
Also a P.E.
Rob Munach
2005-03-16 11:54:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Elle
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
Post by Rob Kleinschmidt
I'm currently shopping for a lightweight and/or a wide range
wrench.
Currently I've got 50 and 150 ft/lb wrenches.
I'm thinking of either something in the 240 in/lb. range or
possibly something like a Craftsman electronic torque meter.
I kinda dislike clickers but they seem to be a lot more common
these days than beam wrenches.
I'm not real sure about the accuracy range on the Craftsman
torque meter. It's got a little electronic box that goes "ping",
so it certainly ought to be accurate :-) but I'm not sure
if the bottom 20% would have the same problems as a mechanical
wrench. I also understand they can be affected by magnetic
fields.
Any input appreciated.
I bought a Pittsburgh, 20 to 200 inch-lb. click type torque wrench from
Harbor Freight last June, on a Father's Day sale for $17.99 . Despite
the
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
contempt some have for Pittsburgh/Harbor Freight, I couldn't resist the
low
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
price. It works great, as far as I can tell. I use it a lot, as I have
just
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
enough nuts and bolts on my car that are down in this range. This
inch-lb
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
torque wrench supplements my other torque wrench by Husky, from Home
Depot
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
in the U.S., $59, 10 to 100 ft-lbs, IIRC.
See the smaller torque wrench at
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=2696 ,
now
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
retailing for $29.
I looked at a Sears electronic torque wrench (not a clicker type nor
beam
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
type) and suspect because of its design its calibration will last
longer
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
and that it is more accurate. But one objection I had to it at the time
was
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
that a lot of the work I do on my car has space limitations. I was
doubtful
Post by Rob Munach
Post by Elle
I could fit the whole transducer into where I needed to apply a torque.
Perhaps this is rarely an issue with a motorcycle. If so, I'd strongly
consider spending the $175 or so that Sears wanted for this.
How do you know your Pittsburg wrench works great?
Rob M.,
I said, "as far as I can tell."
I am going by (1) feel (I previously used a spring setup that I'd
calibrated with weights); (2) a few comparisons with the Husky torque
wrench at overlapping ranges. They appeared to be dead-on the same. It
clicks properly. It's easy enough to set.
Otherwise, how does one know any new torque wrench works great?
Post by Rob Munach
I am sure it clicks
just fine, but at the correct torque?
Elle
Also a P.E.
I have checked my Snap-on clicker with a beam type wrench. Put the
snap-on handle in a vice and connected the two wrenches together with a
coupling nut. I then compared the reading on the beam wrench with the
setting on the snap-on when it clicked. I am assuming that the beam
wrench is accurate as the properties of the steel will likely not change.
--
Rob Munach, PE
Excel Engineering
PO Box 1264
Carrboro, NC 27510
Rob Kleinschmidt
2005-03-18 03:44:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Elle
Post by Rob Kleinschmidt
I'm currently shopping for a lightweight and/or a wide range
wrench.
Currently I've got 50 and 150 ft/lb wrenches.
I'm thinking of either something in the 240 in/lb. range or
possibly something like a Craftsman electronic torque meter.
I kinda dislike clickers but they seem to be a lot more common
these days than beam wrenches.
I'm not real sure about the accuracy range on the Craftsman
torque meter. It's got a little electronic box that goes "ping",
so it certainly ought to be accurate :-) but I'm not sure
if the bottom 20% would have the same problems as a mechanical
wrench. I also understand they can be affected by magnetic
fields.
Any input appreciated.
I bought a Pittsburgh, 20 to 200 inch-lb. click type torque wrench from
Harbor Freight last June, on a Father's Day sale for $17.99 . Despite the
contempt some have for Pittsburgh/Harbor Freight, I couldn't resist the low
price. It works great, as far as I can tell. I use it a lot, as I have just
enough nuts and bolts on my car that are down in this range. This inch-lb
torque wrench supplements my other torque wrench by Husky, from Home Depot
in the U.S., $59, 10 to 100 ft-lbs, IIRC.
See the smaller torque wrench at
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=2696 , now
retailing for $29.
I looked at a Sears electronic torque wrench (not a clicker type nor beam
type) and suspect because of its design its calibration will last longer
and that it is more accurate. But one objection I had to it at the time was
that a lot of the work I do on my car has space limitations. I was doubtful
I could fit the whole transducer into where I needed to apply a torque.
Perhaps this is rarely an issue with a motorcycle. If so, I'd
strongly
Post by Elle
consider spending the $175 or so that Sears wanted for this.
I've bought a 0-24 ft/lb beam wrench from eBay. I'll have to check
the accuracy when I get it, but I think I'll probably be able to
understand how it works without too much trouble :-) and it doesn't
look as though it's likely to be affected by phases of the moon,
magnetic fields etc.

This ought to be fine for the few light torque jobs I need.

The one thing it lacks is an easy way to use it upside down,
but I've already got a 10mm adapter that'll take care of most
of these cases.

Thanks for the advice.

Bownse
2005-03-12 15:03:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ben Halicki
Hi all,
I'm looking to buy a torque wrench over the next few days and was
wondering if you guys could give me a few tips on what to buy. I have
found one made by Norbar, which should handle anything between 8-60NM,
but wasn't sure if I should go 3/8 or 1/2"? It'll spend most of its
days tightening engine bolts. What do you guys use?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
Ben.
get two.

craftsman has a dial one that's from 8 to 80 ft/lbs that has 2 small
windows displaying both foot pounds and newman meters.

then get an inch-point (or the equivalent) for the lighter jobs. it's
better to use the i-p one in the middle of its range than a f-p one at
the very bottom edge of its range. convert when needed by simple math.
--
Mark Johnson, Ft. Worth, TX
http://www.bikes-n-spikes.org
This would be *really* funny if it weren't happening to me.
Bownse
2005-03-12 22:06:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bownse
then get an inch-point (or the equivalent) for the lighter jobs. it's
better to use the i-p one in the middle of its range than a f-p one at
the very bottom edge of its range. convert when needed by simple math.
"... inch-pound..."
--
Mark Johnson, Ft. Worth, TX
http://www.bikes-n-spikes.org
"Never be afraid to try something new. Remember; amateurs built the Ark
- Professionals built the Titanic." -Anonymous
B. Peg
2005-03-12 17:26:45 UTC
Permalink
I've got one of these buried in the garage. It works pretty well and is
fast, especially with high torque values where I get a bit jerky with a
regular wrench (a snipe does wonders!). It beeps when approaching and then
tones out at whatever value you set. I use it with a 1/2" breaker bar most
of the time or if I need less values I'll snap on a 3/8" and an adapter.
Sears sells the same unit under their Craftsman logo for around $150. There
is a company who will interface it to a talking box so that blind or
visually impaired mechanics can use it.

http://www.fastechnology.com/english/products/series1000.htm

For the visually impaired:

http://www.hear-it.com/html/speakfast.html

Would not surprise me if their is a talking torque wrench out their
somewhere similar to a clicker which is also nice.

B~
Cees Keyer
2005-03-12 17:46:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ben Halicki
Hi all,
I'm looking to buy a torque wrench over the next few days and was
wondering if you guys could give me a few tips on what to buy. I have
found one made by Norbar, which should handle anything between 8-60NM,
but wasn't sure if I should go 3/8 or 1/2"? It'll spend most of its
days tightening engine bolts. What do you guys use?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
Ben.
I have good experience with Gedore and Stahlwille torque wrenches.
Facom and Belzer are probably good.
I do not know if they are for sale in th eUSA

good luck
--
# A brain storm to one person could be a slight draft to the other one.
# Cees Keyer, Amsterdam school of technology
# dept. Electronic Engineering, Weesperzijde 190, 1097DZ Amsterdam, NL
# pe1jmj-at-amsat.org Voice: (+31)20-5951639, Fax: (+31)20-5951620
Ben Halicki
2005-03-14 05:34:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cees Keyer
Post by Ben Halicki
Hi all,
I'm looking to buy a torque wrench over the next few days and was
wondering if you guys could give me a few tips on what to buy. I have
found one made by Norbar, which should handle anything between 8-60NM,
but wasn't sure if I should go 3/8 or 1/2"? It'll spend most of its
days tightening engine bolts. What do you guys use?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
Ben.
I have good experience with Gedore and Stahlwille torque wrenches.
Facom and Belzer are probably good.
I do not know if they are for sale in th eUSA
good luck
Thanks for all the advice guys, I ended up ordering a 1/2" Norbar,
hopefully it'll do the job.

Cheers,

Ben.
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...